■ Mibu no Hanataue  (壬生の花田植) ■

 

 

Copyright (C) 2002-2006: Kari Gröhn. All rights reserved.

 

 Oxen decorated with flowers and colourful saddles plough the water-laden paddy and saotome (rice-planting girls), wearing hats made from sedge and their sleeves tied back with red sashes, plant rice seedlings in unison to the rhythm of male drummers behind them. The drummers’ band of the fields (tahayashi) consists of drums, hand bells and flutes. Taue-uta, rice-planting song for welcoming the god of rice paddies to the field, has three parts: asa-uta, morning song, hiru-uta, day song, and shimai-uta, ending song. Because of the exceptional beauty of the scene, this festival is known as Mibu no Hana Taue, Mibu Flower Rice Planting. The festival started in the middle of the Edo period.

 

 

Copyright (C) 2002-2006: Kari Gröhn. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Copyright (C) 2002-2006: Kari Gröhn. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Copyright (C) 2002-2006: Kari Gröhn. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Copyright (C) 2002-2006: Kari Gröhn. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Copyright (C) 2002-2006: Kari Gröhn. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Copyright (C) 2002-2006: Kari Gröhn. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Copyright (C) 2002-2006: Kari Gröhn. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright (C) 2002-2006: Kari Gröhn. All rights reserved.

 

 


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